Striped Woodpecker, Veniliornis lignarius, Torres del Paine NP, Patagonia, Chile

Perching on a dead branch, a female Striped Woodpecker Veniliornis lignarius looks for insect larvae in Torres del Paine NP, Chilean Patagonia. The smallest of Patagonian woodpeckers, it is found around the edge of Nothofagus southern beech stands.

Striped Woodpecker, Photo © Rodrigo Tapia, Far South Expeditions
Striped Woodpecker, Photo © Rodrigo Tapia, Far South Expeditions

Diademed Sandpiper-Plover, Phegornis mitchellii, Santiago, Central Chile

Probing the mud with one of the longest bills of any plover, a Diademed Sandpiper-Plover wades and looks for invertebrates in a high bog in the Andes east of Santiago, central Chile. A striking bird, its very name reflects the puzzle that early ornithologists faced when confronted with a shorebird that exhibits mixed traits of both Plovers and Sandpipers families.

Diademed Sandpiper-Plover, Photo © Rodrigo Tapia, Far South Expeditions
Diademed Sandpiper-Plover, Photo © Rodrigo Tapia, Far South Expeditions

Southern Fulmar, Fulmarus glacialoides, Valparaiso, Chile

Taking off after feeding in the surface a Southern Fulmar, Fulmarus glacialoides taxies vigorously to become airborne in the cold and rich waters of the Humboldt Current in the South-eastern Pacific off Valparaiso in Central Chile. The sole member of genus Fulmarus in the Southern Hemisphere, it is identified by its silvery-grey plumage colour and pink bill with a blue nose tube and black tip, and after breeding in and around Antarctica it disperses across the southern oceans looking for highly productive cold marine currents where it feeds mostly on pelagic invertebrates.

Southern Fulmar, Photo © Rodrigo Tapia, Far South Expeditions
Southern Fulmar, Photo © Rodrigo Tapia, Far South Expeditions

Risso’s Dolphin, Grampus griseus, Valparaiso, Chile

Showing their typical round forehead and scarred pale-grey bodies, a small pod of Risso’s Dolphin, Grampus griseus breaches close to our boat during one of our pelagics off Valparaiso in the Pacific, Central Chile. This curious dolphin is one of several cetaceans that regularly show up on such offshore excursions.

Risso's Dolphin, Photo © Rodrigo Tapia, Far South Expeditions
Risso’s Dolphin, Photo © Rodrigo Tapia, Far South Expeditions

Dusky Tapaculo, Scytalopus fuscus, Valparaiso, Chile

Vigorously flicking its tail, a Dusky Tapaculo, Scytalopus fuscus allows for a fleeting glimpse while scurrying from one bush to another. An endemic to central Chile, it is heard more than it is seen, as it likes to live in the midst of the thickest brush.

Dusky Tapaculo, Photo © Rodrigo Tapia, Far South Expeditions
Dusky Tapaculo, Photo © Rodrigo Tapia, Far South Expeditions

Chilean Tinamou, Nothoprocta perdicaria, Central Chile

Looking for invertebrate prey in the grass, a Chilean Tinamou, Nothoprocta perdicaria allows for a brief glimpse in the open before returning to the safety of the brush on a field in Central Chile.

An endemic tinamou to Chile, it belongs to a South American family that is related to rheas and are the only flying Ratites.

Chilean Tinamou, Photo © Rodrigo Tapia, Far South Expeditions
Chilean Tinamou, Photo © Rodrigo Tapia, Far South Expeditions